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Each parent of a child with MSUD carries a defective gene for MSUD along with a normal gene. The defective gene is a recessive gene, therefore parents are called "carriers" and are not affected by the disorder. Each child with MSUD has received a defective gene from each parent.

When both parents are carriers, there is a 1 in 4 chance with each pregnancy that the baby will receive a defective gene from each parent and have MSUD; a 2 in 4 chance the baby will receive one defective and one normal gene, thus becoming a carrier of MSUD; and a 1 in 4 chance the baby will receive two normal genes. Persons with two normal genes cannot pass MSUD to their offspring.









Our Story

On April 23 2015, our precious firstborn son Eliyahu Tuvia was born in Jacksonville, FL. All seemed well and we took our bundle of joy home.

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Metformin As A Possible Therapeutic Agent In The Treatment Of MSUD

The MSUD Family Support Group has provided funds to Buck Institute for its preliminary studies investigating metformin

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I want to help out, but I don’t know how

Have you ever wanted to help out the MSUD Family Support Group but were unsure about how to contribute? The MSUD Family Support Group is actively looking for volunteers to assist with advocacy and fundraising efforts.

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From The Chairman’s Desk

On July the 21st the MSUD Board of Directors traveled to Bethesda, Maryland for our annual Board meeting. We stayed at the Hyatt Regency in Bethesda.

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Adjusting Protein In An Adult With MSUD

A little over a year ago, in January, Jeff was just not himself. He had limited energy, was not eating well, and often appeared slightly agitated.

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In The Professional Journals

A Patient with MSUD: Acute Management with Sodium Phenylacetate/Sodium Benzoate and Sodium Phenylbutyrate

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A Child's Life

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